Finding your dream

Let’s talk dreams.
On Wednesday, I’m going to start publishing my guest posts. Be prepared to experience some AH-MAZING content from some of the best people I know!
But all the inspiration in the world won’t help you if you don’t know what your own dream is. And that’s really what I’m all about; helping people pursue their dreams. What better way to start then defining yours?
I struggled with this a lot, in fact, I still struggle with it if I let my imagination get away with me too much.
When I was little, I liked sparkly pink everything. I wanted a pink handgun (If you know me, you may have just fallen out of your chair). I walked around the house in big dresses and high heels.
Once, my mom was talking about talents and gifts, so I inquired as to what she meant, when she finished explaining, I said “well, my gifts are princesses and coloring.” At that time in my life I had the dream of becoming a fashion designer.

Somewhere around 13, I did a complete 360°. I wouldn’t touch anything pink, I wore cowboy boots everywhere (okay, still guilty of that one…). I didn’t own a single pair of skinny jeans and a pink handgun would make me vomit a bit in my mouth. During this phase, I was bound and determined to run out west and be a cowboy (well, cowgirl. But that can imply pink sparkly boots. I still don’t do pink and sparkly.)
In my senior year of high school, I came to the realization that running away out west is a bit harder than I thought. So, instead of shooting for just that goal, I decided to pursue a career in the great outdoors.
That brings us here! My whole point is this; I’ve had a lot of dreams in my short life.
Many of them I still have. It’s hard for me to narrow down exactly what dream I’m chasing because I have so many passions I long to pursue. The truth is, that it’s easy to do nothing when you want to do everything. Currently, I’m focusing on horses and outdoors by working at children’s camps, pursuing outdoor certifications, searching for programs training in extreme outdoor activities. Being in the place I’m in right now, I job search both topics and see what God’s brings to me.
So now you know more about my dreams, let’s get back you:
Whether you have a ton of passions (like myself) or feel completely overwhelmed due to not knowing your dream, I’m hoping and praying that this post will help you pinpoint a goal to start working towards.

Grab a notebook, pen, and find a quiet place.

First, let’s define “dream”:

Dream
Noun- a : a strongly desired goal or purpose
(From Merriam-Webster Dictionary) 

I love those words Desired goal or purpose

I’m going to ask you some quick questions, and I want you to write down the first answer that you think of. Don’t overthink – just answer!

1)What is a situation in your life where you were at your best? Brainstorm keywords or concepts from that situation to help you nail down ideas of what makes you come alive.

2)What kind of lifestyle do you want to live? (Big city? Backcountry? Small town?)

3) Where do you want to be in 5 years? (don’t overthink this! Just write. Remember to keep it realistic, no “on a beach with no responsibilities and a million dollars.”)

4)What sets your soul on fire?

There! That was pretty easy no?
Now, go back over your answers and think a bit deeper. Make sure that the answers you put you truly mean.

Let’s focus on #4.
What sets your soul on fire?
Go to a separate page in your notebook, write your answer in big, bold letters at the top of the page.
Next, determine if this is a career or hobby. Could you do this 40 hours a week? Is there a clear job field that fits your dream?

Next, open up that google app!
Start googling everything related to your answer.
Are other people doing it?
Is it a common dream?
What sort of jobs pop up?
Can you make money from it?
(These questions are for more of the obscure dreamers, like myself. If your dream is to be a Doctor, the answers will be most likely pretty cut and dried.)

Spend as long as you can researching.

Lastly, start figuring out an action plan. Try to be as detailed as possible, and try your best to make the action plan until you “achieve” your dream. However, don’t overwhelm yourself. If you can only write down two action steps consider it a win! You’re two steps closer to your dream than you were half an hour ago.
I have a few actions plans.
My “outdoor career” one is a bit shorter due to the fact that I get too overwhelmed if I try to do a 5-year plan, so it looks more like this:
1)Save up a bunch of money.
2)Attend a semester-long outdoor sports and leadership program to gain experience and acquire     certifications in the outdoor field.
Annnndddd that’s where that plan stops.

But, when I started my blog, that action plan had more steps:
1) Research blogs related to my niche.
2) Reach out to other bloggers to figure out what platform to use.
3) Find a domain name.
4) Register a domain name, and create an official website.
5) Design site.
6) Learn basics of social media marketing.
7) Find best graphic design apps.
I’m going to stop there because there are about 20 more! And while doing that all, I was prepping content.

I really hope that this post helped you, even in a small way.
If you’re still overwhelmed, don’t sweat it too much. I mean, don’t live in your parent’s basement for longer than you must, but don’t give yourself anxiety attacks either (been there, done that, not fun.)
For now, focus on that first step. Even if it’s “work at an awful job that pays well to save up cash.” (that’s my first step! I know how you feel!)

My final note: If you know what your dream is, don’t give in to what everyone else is telling you.
If you don’t want to go to college but have a clear action plan for something, don’t give into the social norm that you have to go to college to have a life.
If people tell you that you’re crazy, just remember:
Walt Disney was fired from a newspaper for “not being creative enough” and his first business went bankrupt. And, well, you know the rest of the story.

Happy Adventuring,

~Grace

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